Elections for municipal government are held every four years on the fourth Monday of October.

When are local elections held?
The next municipal election will be held Monday, October 22, 2018. The last municipal election was held on October 27, 2014.  Those thinking they have a future career in municipal politics can file nomination papers from Tuesday, May 1, 2018 up until 2 p.m. on Friday, July 27, 2018.

Elections for municipal government are held every four years on the fourth Monday of October. Prior to the the passage of the Good Government Act, 2009 and the vote in 2006, the period between elections had been 3 years. For example, 2000, 2003 and 2006 were municipal election years. 

The Legislative Assembly of Ontario legislation (Bill 81, Schedule H), passed in 2006, set the length of terms in office for all municipal elected officials at four years. 

Where the polling day falls on a holiday, polling day shall be the next succeeding day that is not a holiday.  

Think about all the services your municipal government is responsible for providing.  

Roads. Public transit. Child Care. Local policing. Water and sewers. Ambulances. Parks. Recreation.  

Learn who in your community best represents your position on the issues that mean the most to you and your family.  

Who can vote in the elections? 
Anyone can vote in a municipal election who, on the day of the election, is: 

  • 18 years of age or older 
  • a Canadian citizen; and 
  • either a resident of the municipality or a property owner or tenant or the spouse or same sex partner of an owner or tenant in the municipality during a specified time just before the election.  
To be able to vote, your name must be on the list of eligible voters.  

If you are on the voters list, you should receive a card in late October telling you that you are eligible to vote. If you think you are eligible to vote, but have not received your card by the end of October in an election year, call your municipality to find out what to do in order to vote. Often, municipalities will publish this kind of information in the local newspaper.

Who can be a candidate? 
Generally, anyone who is eligible to vote may be a candidate for a position on a municipal council.  

When you think about candidates for federal or provincial elections, you usually think about the political party that each candidate represents. In municipal elections in Ontario, candidates are not elected to represent a political party.  

Election Calendar

(Source: Ministry of Municipal Affairs)

Changes to the election calendar reflect recommendations from the public, municipal councils and municipal staff to shorten the election campaign period. The first day that nominations can be filed for a regular election will be May 1st. Nomination day (the deadline to file a nomination) for a regular election will move to the fourth Friday in July (July 27, for the 2018 election).

A number of other deadlines related to regular elections have also changed:
  • The deadline for a municipality to pass a by-law to place a question on the ballot has moved to March 1st in an election year. The deadline for other questions (e.g. a school board, a minister’s question) will be May 1st.
  • The deadline to pass by-laws authorizing the use of alternative voting, such as by mail or by internet, and vote counting equipment will be May 1st in the year before the election (e.g., May 1, 2017 for the 2018 election).
  • The clerk will need to have procedures and forms related to alternative voting and vote counting equipment in place by December 31st in the year before the election.